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Fulton County Diabetes Community Coalition urges residents to learn about risks | Health

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Fulton County Diabetes Community Coalition urges residents to learn about risks
Health
Fulton County Diabetes Community Coalition urges residents to learn about risks

ATLANTA -- Mar. 26 is the 25th annual American Diabetes Association® Alert Day® (ADA), a one-day "wake-up call" asking the American public to take the Diabetes Risk Test to find out if they are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes.   The Diabetes Community Action Coalition (DCAC) of Fulton County extends the call to action to all county residents.

Since 2011, the Diabetes Community Action Coalition of Fulton County has been working to mobilize community groups to reduce the health and financial burden of diabetes through education, the promotion of healthy lifestyles, and policy, system and environmental changes. Recent estimates project that as many as one in three American adults will have diabetes in 2050 unless steps are taken to Stop Diabetes.

In addition to providing education and increasing awareness, DCAC also focuses their efforts to prevent diabetes by addressing food deserts through Urban Community Gardens Initiative and through the Healthy Corner Store Network Initiative.

According to the Georgia Department of Public health, diabetes and its complications are serious medical conditions disproportionately affecting vulnerable population groups including: aging (elderly) adults, medically underserved, pregnant women and persons of various ethnic backgrounds. Diabetes is the 10th leading cause of death among Georgia adults, accounting for nearly 2,000 deaths in 2010. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death among Georgia men (988 deaths in 2010) and 10th leading cause of death among Georgia women (979 deaths in 2010).

The ADA estimates that the total cost of diagnosed diabetes have risen to $245 billion in 2012 from $174 billion in 2007. The organization also states that among the primary risk factors for type 2 diabetes are being overweight, sedentary, over the age of 45 and having a family history of diabetes. African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are at an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

Studies have shown that Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed by losing just 7 percent of body weight (such as 15 pounds if you weigh 200) through regular physical activity (30 minutes a day, five days a week) and healthy eating. By understanding the risks, action can be taken to help prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.

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